Making sense of health certifications

As if the world of nutrition wasn’t confusing enough, throw in the terms registered dietitian (RD), registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), and nutritionist and you may need some help figuring out where to begin when it comes to health certifications.

Whether you have prediabetes, you’re thinking of having or have had a gastric bypass surgery or you have digestive problems, going to the right person can make all the difference. So, what is the difference and whom should you go to for expert nutrition advice?

The term nutritionist is unregulated, and is a self-designated term anyone, regardless of education, training, background or credentials can use. While some nutritionists have an undergraduate degree in nutrition, others have completed a quick online program and many simply just have a personal passion for food and weight loss. Be careful!

The term nutritionist is unregulated and can be used by anyone Click To Tweet

What about a registered dietitian compared to a registered dietitian nutritionist? They’re exactly the same. In 2013, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics added the term and is giving each RD/RDN the option of deciding which title to use.

organic-food-featured
Be careful who you consult with about diet. While nutritionists may be able to assist, the term is unregulated and self-designated. A healthier option is to work with a dietitian or certified health and wellness coach.

A dietitian is the only credentialed, licensed nutrition professional. They have a minimum undergraduate degree in nutrition from an accredited institution, have completed a supervised practice through an accredited internship, and passed a national board exam. Every step of their training is overseen by the Commission on Dietetic Registration and once becoming an RD/RDN, dietitians are required to undergo continuing education and work to renew their registration every five years.

What about other health and wellness areas? You always want to look for someone who has training and credentialing from a reputable organization. For example, does your personal trainer have a certification? Likely, but it isn’t required depending on where they work. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) is considered the top personal training certificate, while other reputable organizations include ACE, AFFA, and NASM.

In the health coaching arena, anyone can call themselves a wellness coach, but where did that title come from? Houston Methodist Wellness Services has certified health and wellness coaches (CHWC) that undergo training through Wellcoaches, a program accredited by the International Coach Federation and requires certain undergraduate degrees, classroom instruction, practical experience and exams before credentials are earned. Certified health and wellness coaches, like dietitians and certified personal trainers, are also required to do continuing education to maintain their credentials.

So, before you trust your health and wellness to just anyone, be sure to ask about his or her background so you can proceed confidently. At Houston Methodist, we have certified and licensed massage therapists and acupuncturists, registered dietitians, ACSM-certified personal trainers and certified health and wellness coaches ready to help you achieve your goals.

Don’t be fooled by fat-free foods

It’s been said that the best things in life are free. Many people think when they see fat-free foods that they have hit the jackpot. They can eat as much as they want because the item contains no fat.

Unfortunately, foods labeled fat free, reduced fat, low fat or sugar free do not equate with calorie-free and contain additives like salt, sugar and chemical fillers that make them less than healthy.

If you want to keep off unwanted pounds, you need to look beyond the claims on the front of the package and take a critical eye to the nutrition label and ingredients. Labeling a food item fat free is a classic bait-and-switch marketing strategy the food industry uses to try and get consumers to forget about the calories.

Labeling a food as fat free is a tactic companies use to get consumers to forget about calories Click To Tweet

Kari Kooi, RD, LD, with Houston Methodist Wellness Services, says reduced-fat products often contain the exact number of calories per serving as full-fat versions.

Reduced-fat foods have a perceived healthy image that researchers have dubbed a “health halo.” Studies have shown that people tend to eat twice as much or more of these foods.

Nutrition facts
Don’t just look at fat content. You need to also pay attention to serving size and other macronutrients such as carbohydrates.

Manufacturers often set the serving size for packaged foods to be unrealistically small (a serving size of Oreos is three cookies, ha!), so it’s important to look at the number of servings per container.

For example, chips and drinks offered at the checkout lane in the grocery store appear to have one serving, but often times have two or more.

Instead of looking for products with health claims such a low fat, Kooi suggests concentrating on eating healthy fats from whole foods such as nuts, olive oil and avocados. Monounsaturated fats found in these foods have been shown to lower LDL or bad cholesterol and boost HDL or good cholesterol in the blood.

Omega-3 fats in oily fish such as salmon and anchovies also have been shown to lower LDL. She says that fat plays a strong role in feeling satisfied after eating, thereby helping with appetite control and should make up at least 30% of our daily calories.

She also recommends avoiding trans fats as much as possible as it promotes inflammation in the body. Products that contain partially hydrogenated oil in the ingredients list have trans fat.

When it comes to sugar free, it’s extremely important for people with diabetes to be smart label readers. Sugar is a carbohydrate and foods such as sugar-free cookies or candy are not free of carbohydrates. A person with diabetes may be unintentionally consuming large amounts of carbohydrates, which could lead to increased blood glucose levels.

The best way for all of us to avoid being fooled by reduced fat and sugar-free labels and putting on those unwanted pounds is to shop for nutrient-dense foods that don’t come in a package and therefore require no labeling.

What does organic food really mean?

Go to a mainstream grocery store today and you’ll see an expanded section specifically for organic food. Perhaps you’re looking for the latest nutrition bar you saw at a coffee shop; you’ll likely be directed to the “health” foods section filled with organic, extra virgin expeller-pressed coconut oil, gluten-free rice flour pasta and Annie’s organic children’s snacks.

Though organic foods have been available for over three decades, lately they have been taking the market by storm. Organic grocery sales continue to grow faster than conventional sales and the 2014 Farm Act has mandated $160 million be put toward organic farming production. Interestingly, despite growing demand, the number of farms seeking organic certification has leveled off.

organic-food-chart
Chart via United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service

Consumers often associate organic with healthy, but organic certification focuses solely on how crops are grown and animals are raised. While some organic products are more nutritious, others aren’t. Organic cookies typically have just as much fat and sugar as regular cookies, and those organic potato chips are still deep-fried. Let’s take a look at what organic really means.

Organic labeling standards vary by item, but the general goals of organic farming are to conserve natural resources, promote biodiversity and use only approved substances in production. If you see the USDA organic seal on an item, this means it was produced by a certified organic farm shown to follow organic guidelines such as banning synthetic pesticides, participating in crop rotation and using responsible irrigation. Each year, the USDA requires at least 5% of all farms with organic status be audited for compliance. The USDA organic seal means the following for each item: 

Organic crops like fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains

Farmers did not use synthetic pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, irradiation, genetically modified organisms or sewage sludge.

Organic beef, pork, and poultry

Animals have access to outdoors and raised on 100% organic feed free of animal byproducts like skin and dried blood; no growth hormones, antibiotics, or other drugs; no irradiation.

Organic certification focuses solely on how crops are grown and animals are raised Click To Tweet

Organic eggs

Hens have 100% organic feed and are free of growth hormones, antibiotics or other drugs. Hens do not have to be cage-free or free-range.

Organic milk

Cows have access to outside at least 120 days of the year and have at least 30% pasture diet; no growth hormones, antibiotics, or other drugs.

There are several reasons why organically-grown crops may be more nutritious for us. Without the aid of synthetic chemicals, plants must build up their own strength to fight off pests. These healthy, natural plant defenses are then passed to humans when consumed.

Organic fruits and vegetables also tend to stay on the vine longer, ripening naturally and building up nutrient stores. They are typically grown in more nutrient-dense soil, which also helps the plants to soak up more nutrition. Think about how much better a homegrown tomato tastes compared to one from the supermarket. Some of the same factors making that garden tomato so delicious also make it more nutritious!

Not ready to pay the premium for organic? Look for U.S.-grown produce and avoid imports. Since the Food Quality Protection Act was passed in 1996, risk from American produce has dropped dramatically. You can also buy organic on selected items that are more likely to be contaminated. Skip organic bananas since the thick peel protects the fruit, but strawberries carry a higher risk. 

Each year the Environmental Working Group puts out their Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. It highlights conventional foods that have the most and least pesticide residues.

5 nutrition tips for a healthy holiday plate

When do the holidays start for you? Is it October 1st when you pull out the fall decorations and start dreaming of pumpkin spice lattes? Perhaps it’s Halloween when candy, and the excuse to eat it, is everywhere. Maybe you even hold off until the office Thanksgiving potluck, but even then your holiday season may last from mid-November until the first full week in January.

Holiday season and the plethora of sweet and savory indulgences that tags along may extend for almost a quarter of the year! If you’re tired of the painful, uncomfortable feeling that may accompany your holiday meals and don’t want to start 2015 several pounds up on the scale, consider some of these ideas for a healthier plate.

Simplify. Whether you’re cooking or not, try reducing the number of dishes. Do you really need green bean and asparagus casserole, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, pasta salad, turkey and ham? It’s a lot easier to shop, prepare, and serve six or seven dishes compared to a dozen, plus you’ll help your guests limit their plates, too.

Baked sweet potato
Eliminate sugary extras from dishes. For example, instead of a sweet casserole, bake your sweet potatoes and garnish them with herbs.

Eliminate the extras. Does the sweet potato casserole really need a full cup of brown sugar plus marshmallows and crushed-up corn flakes? Try baked sweet potatoes with butter, brown sugar, and nuts on the side. This gives your guests control.

Careful with carbs. Thanksgiving is a carbohydrate nightmare! Rolls, stuffing made with more bread, cranberry sauce, applesauce, potatoes in all forms and colors, perhaps some crackers and cheese beforehand, and before dessert has even begun you’re well over what your body needs. Instead, take an extra slice of turkey, a lean meat, and pile up the vegetables.

Holiday meals have lots of carbs. For a healthier plate, opt for more lean protein and vegetables Click To Tweet

Be selective. Whether it’s setting parameters around snacking on treats in the break room, like only indulging on Fridays, or deciding to have either alcohol or dessert but not both, make your food choices wisely. Save room for the dishes you really enjoy and skip the ones you know aren’t a favorite.

Leave space. Try to leave white space on your plate as you’re adding on your favorite dishes. Don’t let your food touch and don’t pile on layer after layer. Leaving space on your plate will help leave space in your stomach, too!

So much goes into a healthy holiday, from the right food choices, to sticking with your exercise routine. Remember the holidays were originally just a day or two (not several months) and it’s refreshing to start the New Year feeling healthy and satisfied rather than lethargic and disappointed. The energy you’ll get from successfully navigating the holidays will be worth those changes you’re considering!

Looking to cut back on the carbs during the holidays? Check out our low-carb Pinterest recipe board

Follow Houston Methodist’s board Low-Carb Recipes on Pinterest.

Test your knowledge of superfoods

While exercise and lifestyle factors are important to overall health, so is diet, and that’s why it’s important to make your food choices count.

Superfoods are foods that are nutrient dense, meaning they pack many healthy benefits into every bite. Want to test your superfood knowledge? Take the quiz below.

Every Monday, we showcase a new superfood on Facebook, Google+, Twitter and Instagram

 

Paint your plate with phytochemical foods

Color is a key element of the full sensory experience of eating and plays a big role in making food attractive and desirable. That’s why it makes perfect sense that nature’s most nutrient-dense foods are designed to be colorful.

Food has the amazing power to influence everything from your mood to overall health. You can maximize your body’s potential for radiantly-good health by fueling your body with a rainbow of plants. You will feel light and energized from eating this way instead of having that sleepy, sluggish feeling a “beige” diet of processed, refined foods leaves you with.

Think of your plate as a canvas; add splashes of vibrant, vivid colors to optimize nutrient density and to shower your body with the entire phytochemical spectrum.

What are phytochemicals, you ask? Phytochemicals are plant compounds that provide cell-protective antioxidant power and impart different colors to plant foods. That’s why it’s so important to think in terms of eating from the rainbow. More than 10,000 phytochemicals have been found and scientists speculate there are several thousand more yet to be discovered. 

blueberries-in-cartons
Blueberries get their color from anthocyanins, which help protect the brain from oxidative stress.

Plants produce phytochemicals to protect themselves from environmental threats such as the sun’s ultraviolet rays. When we eat plant foods, they impart these protective properties to our bodies and offer disease prevention in a number of complex ways.

For example, lycopene is responsible for the red coloring of watermelon and tomatoes and offers skin protection from the sun, while anthocyanins give blueberries their deep-blue hue and can help slow age-related memory loss by protecting the brain from oxidative stress. Lutein and zeaxanthin provide emerald green coloring to broccoli, kale and spinach and play a key role in maintaining healthy vision.

Phytochemical foods exert their antioxidant power by shielding our cells from the damaging effects of free radicals. Each phytochemical has a fancy scientific name, but all you have to remember is to eat the rainbow in plant foods every day and you will get the full spectrum of phytochemicals.

Phytochemical foods exert their antioxidant power by shielding our cells from the damaging effects of free… Click To Tweet

Colorful ideas for painting your plate:

  • Swap pale iceberg lettuce for dark-green arugula or spinach. The richer the color, the more phytochemicals present. 
  • Stir berries (fresh or frozen) into cereal, oatmeal or yogurt. For an even greater antioxidant boost, eat a mix of berries. Shopping tip: Frozen produce is often more nutrient-dense than fresh. 
  • Jazz up salads by adding orange or grapefruit segments, apple or nectarine slices, sliced beets, dried cherries or pomegranate seeds.
  • Add grated carrots and zucchini to pasta sauce, turkey burgers or meatloaf for moisture and a pop of color.
  • Stuff color into sandwiches with sliced apple, avocado, cucumber, spinach and/or sprouts. 
  • Spread creamy avocado onto whole-wheat toast and top with slices of juicy tomato for a plant-powered snack.
  • Mix fresh herbs and chopped tomato or red bell pepper into your scrambled eggs.

The meal frequency myth

“Eating five to six mini meals a day … keeps your metabolism humming 24/7,” proclaims a Redbook article. “Have a small meal or snack every 3 to 4 hours keeps your metabolism cranking,” notes a WebMD slideshow

You’ve probably heard similar statements—all based on the assumption that food grazing increases your basal metabolic rate (BMR) or the number of calories used in a day, leading to more fat loss.

Is there any truth to this? Are six meals a day better than three? And what about fasting? Does skipping meals negatively impact your health?

Deconstructing the metabolic fire analogy

Advocates of increased meal frequency usually compare BMR to a fire. If you think of a fire, the fuel is wood and when wood is thrown on an existing fire, more fire is produced, throwing off heat.

If you apply this analogy to people, the wood is calories from food and the reaction that produces heat is the thermic effect of food (TEF), which is the amount of energy your body has to expend to process food for storage and use.

Take a look at the chart below the bulleted list. It compares TEF for three people who eat the same amount of calories and macronutrients (fats, carbohydrates and protein):

  • One eats six meals a day (breakfast, a mid-morning snack, lunch, an afternoon snack, dinner and an evening snack)
  • One eats the traditional three meals a day (breakfast, lunch and dinner)
  • One eats only two meals a day (breakfast and dinner)
Screenshot_061
This chart compares the thermic effect of food (TEF) during a day for three people who eat the same amount of calories and macronutrients, but eat in different patterns.

While the TEF spike duration and frequency is different, the total amount of TEF for all three individuals is identical. This means the amount of calories used in a day is the same, regardless of meal frequency.

The amount of calories used in a day is the same, regardless of meal frequency Click To Tweet

Research confirms this: Studies in both 1997 and 2010 noted as long the total amount of food eaten is the same, you can gorge or nibble—neither approach promotes more or less weight loss than the other.

Returning to the fire analogy, eating less but more frequently is like continually throwing kindling on the fire all day long whereas eating more in a sitting (but less frequently) is like throwing a big log on the fire.

What about fasting?

Many are fearful to skip meals because they hear that fasting lowers your BMR, putting your body into starvation mode.

This is oversimplified and inaccurate. It may be true that fasting decreases your BMR, but with one big caveat: It takes over three days of fasting to accomplish this.

In fact, researchers have found that short-term fasting actually increases the amount of calories you burn while at rest and doesn’t affect cognitive performance, activity, sleep or mood.

Could fewer meals be better for you?

A lot of recent research has come out in favor of eating less frequently. For example, a 2014 study found that frequent snacking might stress the liver, leading to a greater risk of fatty liver disease.  

Fasting for short periods of time has been found to have the following health benefits:

Numerous studies have shown that short-term fasting has health benefits and fewer meals may be better for you Click To Tweet

And lowers the risk of:

Eat the way that works for you

There’s no reason to stress out about meal frequency. If you find it easier to make healthy food choices by eating a couple of meals a day and a snack or two, then stick to that. If you like to spend more of the day fasting so you can enjoy larger meals and because it suits your schedule, then stay with that approach.

When it comes to weight loss, overall calories matter more than meal frequency, so always keep an eye on your portions. If you have issues with blood sugar control, work with your doctor to figure out a meal schedule that works for you. 

Reviewed by Kristen Kizer, R.D.

Eating clean by going green

The energetic and radiant hue of emerald green makes it easy to become obsessed with the color. Green also happens to be the color of many in-season foods. So why not go ahead and add splashes of green to your plate?

Bright green is symbolic of in-season green-hued foods bursting with flavor and nutrients. You will be well on your way to “cleaning” your diet by incorporating these free-radical absorbing foods.

Kari Kooi, a registered dietician at Houston Methodist, says “eating clean is a buzzword for a wholesome, unprocessed diet that drastically limits ultra-processed foods made from inferior ingredients while embracing whole foods like fruits and vegetables.”  

There’s no better time to start eating clean and green. Here are five green powerhouse foods to help brighten your plate.

Asparagus

Looking for a natural anti-ager? Emerging in the springtime, these green spears offer a bounty of nutrients. Asparagus is high in glutathione, an antioxidant that can help reduce skin damage from the sun. Additionally, asparagus contains the most folate of any vegetable. Folate plays a vital role in heart health and the prevention of birth defects.

Avocado

Add some thin slices of smooth avocado to your sandwich or salad without feeling guilty. The monounsaturated fat in avocado is what’s mostly responsible for avocado’s super food status. This type of happy fat can help drive down levels of bad cholesterol. 

Brussels sprouts

These baby cabbages are loaded with antioxidants and filling fiber. A cruciferous vegetable, Brussels sprouts contain powerful, cancer-fighting sulfur compounds that are responsible for their pungent aroma. These green jewels take on a whole new flavor and crispy texture when roasted in the oven.

Eating clean means eliminating ultra-processed foods and embracing whole foods like fruits and vegetables Click To Tweet
Fresh Kale
Did you know kale is a better source of calcium than spinach? This is due to its lower levels of oxalic acid.

Kale

This beautiful ruffled green is being called “the queen of greens.” Kale is brimming with eye-nourishing carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, a pair of phytochemicals that has been shown to prevent macular degeneration and cataracts. Additionally, kale is a better source of calcium than spinach as it has lower levels of oxalic acid, a compound that interferes with calcium absorption.

Kiwifruit

Rich in vitamin C, potassium and fiber, kiwis make a perfectly portable snack. Just slice a kiwi in half and scoop out the emerald flesh with a spoon. You will dazzle your body with nutrients. This sweet and tart fruit has a unique taste, with flavors reminiscent of strawberry, banana, melon, pineapple, and citrus

Is high fructose corn syrup worse than sugar?

Not a week goes by in the media without stories about potential health problems associated with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). From brands like Yoplait to Heinz and Hunt’s, consumers are asking for the removal of the ingredient from products and companies are responding.

However, what do you really know about HFCS? Is it the main culprit when it comes to weight gain and metabolic problems or is there more to the story? In order to tackle this subject, let’s first look at HFCS and sugar at the molecular level.

Up close and personal: HFCS and sugar

Time for a little biochemistry: The kind of HFCS used in packaged foods and soda goes by the names HFCS 55 and HFCS 42. In the 55 variant, 55% of molecules are fructose and 42% are glucose. For HFCS 42, the breakdown is 42% fructose and 53% glucose. Both fructose and glucose are basic, simple forms of carbohydrates.

At the molecular level, high fructose corn syrup and sugar are nearly identical Click To Tweet

Why did I provide that molecular breakdown? Sucrose or sugar often replaces HFCS when brands swap ingredients and guess what? It has a 1:1 ratio of glucose to fructose, meaning that 50% of the molecules are fructose and 50% are glucose. At the molecular level, HFCS and sugar are nearly identical.

sucrose
This image shows the molecular layout of sucrose or sugar. 50% of it is fructose and 50% is glucose, making it a near mirror molecular image of high fructose corn syrup.

Research roundup: HFCS vs. sugar

Given that HFCS and sugar have a very similar glucose-to-fructose ratio, what does the nutritional literature have to say about the health effects of HFCS?

According to a 2008 study, “Sucrose and HFCS do not have substantially different short-term endocrine/metabolic effects.” Even when looking at other critical factors like appetite- and fat-related hormones, no difference has been found between sugar and HFCS.

A 2012 study that put subjects on a reduced-calorie diet noted that both the HFCS and sugar group lost similar amounts of weight and body fat, leading researchers to conclude the type of sugar in the diet was of no significance.

All these results are similar to a 2007 critical review in Food Science and Nutrition, which summed up its research saying, “The currently available evidence is insufficient to implicate HFCS per se as a causal factor in the overweight and obesity problem in the United States.”

The real nutritional culprit: excess carbohydrates

It may seem like I’m letting HFCS and sugar off the hook, but I’m not. What’s important to realize is that they’re both carbohydrates and because of their connection to “sweetness,” they shift the conversation away from something people need to be more aware of when it comes to their diet: too many carbohydrates elevates blood sugar.

Note how sugar consumption ramped up  in the early '70s. While sweetener choice has changed with time, one aspect has remained constant: Americans are eating more simple carbohydrates.
Note how sugar consumption ramped up in the early ’70s. While sweetener choice has changed with time, one aspect has remained constant: Americans are eating more simple carbohydrates. Image source: Austin G. Davis-Richardson (Wikipedia)

A diet composed of too many insulin-spiking carbohydrates has been implicated in the following health problems:

Too many insulin-spiking carbohydrates may lead to heart disease, diabetes and macular degeneration Click To Tweet

Making healthier choices

Elimination of foods containing HFCS is a great start to revamping one’s diet as HFCS is typically found in processed foods that contain artificial ingredients, little nutrient density, low fiber counts and hydrogenated vegetable oils.

But don’t be misled: eating the same amount of a food that uses sugar or a similar sweetener in the place of HFCS won’t lead to significant improvements in your health.

Instead, shop the perimeter of the grocery store, stocking up on fibrous fruits and vegetables like berries, avocados and broccoli, and protein sources like wild-caught salmon and grass-fed beef. It’s all about increasing the nutrient density of your food choices and being a more aware consumer.

Reviewed by Kristen Kizer, R.D.

Eating pretty: foods for radiant skin

When it comes to a glowing complexion, nourishing your skin from the inside-out is just as important as what you put on your skin. Eating the right foods can help protect skin from oxidative stress that contributes to the aging process, clear up acne and brighten a dull complexion. Here are some ingredients for attaining radiant skin.

Watermelon

As the name implies, this juicy, super-sweet fruit is over 90 percent water and keeps skin smooth and firm by hydrating cells so they’re plump and full. Watermelon is rich in lycopene, an antioxidant that gives watermelon its pink hue and provides protection against damaging ultraviolet rays. Enjoy a watermelon salad that’s bursting with flavor by simply cutting the watermelon into cubes and combining with spicy arugula, thinly sliced red onion, red-wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil and a sprinkle of crumbled goat cheese.

Lycopene in watermelon provides protection against damaging ultraviolet rays Click To Tweet

Pepitas

Pepitas are hulled pumpkin seeds that are loaded with zinc, a mineral that’s involved in many biochemical processes throughout the body, including skin-cell renewal. A great addition to a homemade trail mix or sprinkled into oatmeal or yogurt, these green seeds have a delicate crunch and a nutty, slightly-sweet flavor. To deepen the flavor of pepitas, stir frequently in a small skillet over medium heat until golden-brown.

Pineapple

This sweet, juicy tropical fruit is chock-full of vitamin C, an antioxidant that plays a strong role in the production of collagen. Collagen is a protein that is essential for keeping skin firm and elastic. Select pineapple with a sweet fragrance at the stem end and make sure it is heavy for its size. Create a dazzling salad that’s brimming with vitamin C by mixing pineapple with other tropical fruits such as kiwi, mango and papaya.

Carrots

If you want a summer tan, crunching on carrots can give you a sun-kissed look without spray tans or damaging sun exposure. The carotenoid antioxidants in carrots, including beta-carotene, give carrots their deep orange coloring and provide a subtle natural tan by the pigments getting deposited in the skin. Beta-carotene keeps skin youthful by targeting and repairing skin damage as well as protecting skin from the ravages of excess sun exposure. Snack on baby carrots dipped in protein-rich hummus or almond butter. Shredded raw carrots add a sweet flavor and bright pop of orange to salads.

Here are three great recipes you can try that incorporate these ingredients.

Almond Butter Log

Almonds make up the base of this creamy recipe.
Almonds make up the base of this creamy recipe.

Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 ripe banana
  • 2-3 cups raw almonds
  • Cinnamon
  • Almond milk

Instructions:

  1. Blend the raw almonds in a blender or food processor.
  2. Stop and stir the nuts every 5 minutes. During the process, the almonds will have the appearance of crumbs but be patient; this can take up to 30 minutes.
  3. Continue blending until the consistency is even.
  4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  5. Peel one ripe banana and cut down the center as if you were making a banana split.
  6. Place the banana on a baking sheet line with aluminum foil, and fill with 1-2 teaspoons of the homemade almond butter.
  7. Gently press the sides together and wrap with foil.
  8. Bake for 15 minutes.
  9. Garnish with a sprinkle of cinnamon.
  10. Let the banana log cool on baking sheet before eating.

Spicy Arugula Watermelon Salad

Watermelon can serve as an excellent base for a salad.
Watermelon pairs well with salad greens.

Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • ½ giant chilled watermelon, cubed or thinly sliced
  • 1 peeled cucumber, diced
  • 1 red tomato, diced
  • 1 yellow tomato, diced
  • 2 tablespoons red onion, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons tarragon leaves
  • 2 tablespoons chives, thinly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons basil leaves, cut into strips
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • 4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions:

  1. In a large bowl mix the fruit, vegetables, then combine with spicy arugula.
  2. In a small dish, whisk together red wine vinegar and olive oil, drizzle dressing over salad and garnish with herbs and goat cheese.

Pineapple Chicken Spread

Chicken spread works great on crackers or in sandwiches.
Chicken spread works great on crackers or in sandwiches.

Time: 55 minutes                                                      

Ingredients:

  • 3 grilled chicken breasts
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 ½ cups pineapple, diced
  • 1 lime
  • ¼ cup cucumber, diced
  • ¼ cup red bell pepper, diced
  • ¼ cup yellow bell pepper, diced
  • ¼ cup red onion, diced
  • 1 cup guacamole dip
  • 1 ½ teaspoons sea salt

Instructions:

  1. Halve the large pineapple lengthwise, and then hollow out one half.
  2. Reserve 1 ½ cup of the fruit for the chicken spread and save the remainder for future use.
  3. Lightly season chicken breasts with sea salt and pepper to taste and grill over medium heat in a large skillet in 2 teaspoons olive Oil.
  4. Once both sides are evenly grilled and tender, remove from heat and let rest for up to 5 minutes.
  5. While the chicken breasts are cooling down, use this time to wash and cut the vegetables. In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix gently.
  6. Juice the lime and add the remaining sea salt if necessary.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap and place in refrigerator for 15-20 minutes. This will give all of your ingredients time to settle which will intensify the flavor.
  8. Fill the hollowed pineapple with the chicken spread mixture and serve with crackers for party guests or serve in a whole wheat pita pocket for a handy, on-the-go lunch.

Recipes by Nitiya Spearman