7 questions for an ER nurse

hen minutes count, it’s best to be prepared. Sharon Tatum, a nurse in the Emergency Department, answers seven questions about knowing when to go to the emergency room and how to get the most out of your visit.  

Q: When should I come to the Emergency Department as opposed to an urgent care?

A: There are some conditions that require time-sensitive treatment to improve your recovery (example – stroke and heart attack). In situations that are serious or life-threatening, it is best to go to the ED.

In situations that are serious or life-threatening, it is best to go to the ED Click To Tweet

Q: What can I do to speed up the process?

A: When you arrive, have your identification ready as this allows us to link you with the correct medical record and start a record for your care. It is important to know your history, including allergies, past medical conditions and surgeries because the more we know, the quicker we intervene.

Q: What can I expect when I arrive?

A: You will be greeted by a nurse who will ask you if you are seeking medical attention. This nurse will determine your level of care based on your medical complaint.

Q: Why am I getting tests/treatment done before I see a doctor?

A: The Medical Director has designed protocols to help speed up the care when the ED is busy. Protocols are tests/treatment that can be completed before you are placed in the room. Examples include X-rays, CT scans, intravenous fluid and medication for nausea.

Q: What should I bring with me?

A: It is important to have a list of the medications that you are taking (including herbal supplements) with the name, dose, how often you take the medication and the last time you took the medication. 

Q: I got here first, why did they take someone before me?

A: Patients are brought back to a treatment room based on the medical complaint, test results, type of treatment needed and the type of room available. Please note that a patient may be taken back for X-rays and blood work then return back to the waiting area until a room becomes available.

Q: What is the busiest time? Least busy?

A: Historically the middle of the week tends to be busier and after 11 a.m. Waiting can be difficult, and wait times are dependent on how many patients are in the department and how many diagnostic tests are required for your care. Please know that we are working hard to expedite your care and apologize for any inconvenience it may cause. We are dedicated to keeping you informed of your plan of care.

Concussion: movies vs. reality

Our hero sinks back into the shadows, waiting for the night watchman to make his regular rounds. He doesn’t have to wait long. He swings with the butt of his pistol and renders the guard unconscious with a blow to the head. “Sweet dreams,” he says. “You’re gonna wake up with a wicked headache.”

Stop the video. For decades, good guys and bad guys (and girls, too) have been knocked out with a bop on the head, a sock to the chin or a quick karate chop. The movies’ all time knockout champ has to be super spy James Bond, who usually comes into consciousness bound and gagged for the next cliffhanger. The hapless detective on The Rockford Files was knocked out pretty much every episode of the TV show’s six-season run.   

We asked Dr. Kenneth Podell, a neuropsychologist and co-director of the Houston Methodist Concussion Center: Is it really possible to smack someone in the head and render them unconscious?

The short answer is yes, it is indeed possible, but the complications come after. “If you hit somebody hard enough with an object to cause unconsciousness, you could also be hitting them hard enough to break the skull,” Podell says. “It depends on the weapon … one with a large surface area (like a frying pan) dissipates the shock over a larger area, while a smaller weapon focuses the force and can easily fracture a skull.”

It doesn't take a big blow to result in a concussion that carries many long-term health effects Click To Tweet

Podell has seen many cases of people suffering long-term effects from concussion after receiving a blow much less violent than those usually depicted in movies. A person coming out of an unconscious episode, waking up as if from a nap, does not happen most of the time. “There’s a kernel of truth there but a blow substantial enough to cause unconsciousness is also very, very dangerous,” he says.

Let’s speed up the video a bit and check out this part: two combatants grapple fiercely in hand-to-hand combat, and the battle is at a deadlock. Suddenly, one uses an explosive head butt to stun his opponent and gain the upper hand.

“Again, this has a bit of truth to it as well … the front, top part of the skull is the thickest part and can theoretically be used as a weapon,” Podell explains. “But remember that’s also the other guy’s thick skull, so the butt-er needs to select a weak point on the butt-ee, like the bridge of the nose or the side of the head.”

Podell cautions that any kind of head injury has the potential to be very serious and have long-term complications. Concussion can cause dizziness, shaky balance, confusion, headaches and memory loss that can linger for weeks or even months. If you suspect you or someone you know may have had a concussion, please immediately seek medical care. 

Like many other physicians, Podell regularly sees things in movies that don’t really line up with real life. He tries to check his expertise at the door, he says, and suspends disbelief to enjoy the fantasy on screen.