Behind the scenes at RODEOHOUSTON

f you live in or near Houston, March is the month you pull out your western gear and become a cowboy or cowgirl to celebrate the return of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo™. RodeoHouston® has it all – a BBQ cook-off, mutton bustin’ for the kiddos, bull riders, barrel racers and hit music stars.

While Houstonians enjoy the festivities for the entire month of March, the rodeo contestants come to town to compete for three days before moving on to the next rodeo. Sprains, strains, fractures, concussions – these are just a few of the injuries contestants risk when they enter the competition. To continue their sport, contestants need a team of health care professionals to back them up. That’s why Houston Methodist is proud to serve as the official health care provider for RodeoHouston.

In a typical night, the @RodeoHouston sports medicine team averages 60-70 treatments for the contestants. Click To Tweet

Houston Methodist coordinates the RodeoHouston sports medicine team with medical volunteers from across the city to ensure a multi-disciplinary team is available to care for contestants and their families. For the sports medicine team, the show starts long before you find your seat in NRG Stadium. A typical day in the RodeoHouston training room looks like this:

  • 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. – A physical therapist treats athletes and Rodeo staff (think Rodeo clowns and other support staff) for injuries sustained the night before or pre-existing injuries
  • 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch break (eat while you can!)
  • 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. – Restock supplies (we go through a lot of tape and ice)
  • 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. – Prepare for the pre-event madness
  • 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. – The competitions usually start around 6 p.m., so between 4 and 6 p.m. is the madness.

In a typical night, we’ll average 60 to 70 treatments for the rodeo contestants. The cowboys and cowgirls come in to ice sore muscles, get therapy for aches and pains, tape their ankles, ask the primary care physician about a lingering health issue like a cold or get the surgeon’s opinion on a recurring shoulder problem. Our team also performs and reads x-rays on-site. 

At the same time, we’re treating the rodeo athletes’ family members. Many contestants travel with their spouses and children, so they need medical care while on the road, too. It may be the husband of a barrel racer with back pain or the son of a bull rider with an ear infection – the team can take care of them all. 

When the competition starts, the contestants know the same team of medical experts taking care of them in the training room will be standing by in case a ride doesn’t go their way. In the arena, two athletic trainers, two emergency medicine/trauma physicians, a team of paramedics and an orthopedic surgeon are ready to provide care if a rider is injured. In case of a concussion, we have neuropsychologist on call to provide an evaluation and treatment recommendations.

When the rodeo is over and the fans are waiting for the concert to begin, the training room is once again packed with athletes coming in to see the medical staff. While not all injuries that occur on the arena floor are serious, they can cause problems if left untreated before the next rodeo in the next town. 

The next day, the cycle repeats. Although the medical staff may change from day to day, we all have the same mission and provide the same level of care for each of the athletes and their family members.

After three days, the contestants move on to the next rodeo, and at the end of March, the medical staff will go back to their normal practices. So, if you’re heading to the rodeo, keep an eye out for the guys and gals in red vests. We’ll be there all night, every night, keeping the contestants at their best. Yeehaw!

Jace Duke

Jace Duke

Manager of Athletic Training at Houston Methodist Hospital
Jace Duke is the Manager of Athletic Training for Houston Methodist Hospital. Jace also serves as a Vice Chairman of the Rodeo Houston Sports Medicine committee. Jace is a former President of the Greater Houston Athletic Trainers' Society and was selected to the organizations inaugural Hall of Honor class on 2014. Jace and his wife Deidre, also and athletic trainer with Houston Methodist, live in League City.
Jace Duke

Latest posts by Jace Duke (see all)

Published by

Jace Duke

Jace Duke is the Manager of Athletic Training for Houston Methodist Hospital. Jace also serves as a Vice Chairman of the Rodeo Houston Sports Medicine committee. Jace is a former President of the Greater Houston Athletic Trainers' Society and was selected to the organizations inaugural Hall of Honor class on 2014. Jace and his wife Deidre, also and athletic trainer with Houston Methodist, live in League City.