7 questions for an ER nurse

hen minutes count, it’s best to be prepared. Sharon Tatum, a nurse in the Emergency Department, answers seven questions about knowing when to go to the emergency room and how to get the most out of your visit.  

Q: When should I come to the Emergency Department as opposed to an urgent care?

A: There are some conditions that require time-sensitive treatment to improve your recovery (example – stroke and heart attack). In situations that are serious or life-threatening, it is best to go to the ED.

In situations that are serious or life-threatening, it is best to go to the ED Click To Tweet

Q: What can I do to speed up the process?

A: When you arrive, have your identification ready as this allows us to link you with the correct medical record and start a record for your care. It is important to know your history, including allergies, past medical conditions and surgeries because the more we know, the quicker we intervene.

Q: What can I expect when I arrive?

A: You will be greeted by a nurse who will ask you if you are seeking medical attention. This nurse will determine your level of care based on your medical complaint.

Q: Why am I getting tests/treatment done before I see a doctor?

A: The Medical Director has designed protocols to help speed up the care when the ED is busy. Protocols are tests/treatment that can be completed before you are placed in the room. Examples include X-rays, CT scans, intravenous fluid and medication for nausea.

Q: What should I bring with me?

A: It is important to have a list of the medications that you are taking (including herbal supplements) with the name, dose, how often you take the medication and the last time you took the medication. 

Q: I got here first, why did they take someone before me?

A: Patients are brought back to a treatment room based on the medical complaint, test results, type of treatment needed and the type of room available. Please note that a patient may be taken back for X-rays and blood work then return back to the waiting area until a room becomes available.

Q: What is the busiest time? Least busy?

A: Historically the middle of the week tends to be busier and after 11 a.m. Waiting can be difficult, and wait times are dependent on how many patients are in the department and how many diagnostic tests are required for your care. Please know that we are working hard to expedite your care and apologize for any inconvenience it may cause. We are dedicated to keeping you informed of your plan of care.

Sharon Tatum

Sharon Tatum

Registered NurseIV at Houston Methodist
Sharon Tatum MSN, RN, is Board Certified as an Advanced Practice Nurse from The American Nurses Credentialing Center. In her role as a RN IV, Sharon is primarily responsible for providing and/or facilitating point of care education and professional development of the nursing staff for the HMH Emergency Department.
Sharon Tatum

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Sharon Tatum

Sharon Tatum MSN, RN, is Board Certified as an Advanced Practice Nurse from The American Nurses Credentialing Center. In her role as a RN IV, Sharon is primarily responsible for providing and/or facilitating point of care education and professional development of the nursing staff for the HMH Emergency Department.