5 tips for returning to exercise after pregnancy

We all know how important exercise is to our health. I can attest to the endorphin rush from a good workout, and crave that post-run euphoria. Or at least I used to.

When I got pregnant two years ago my doctor advised me to keep my heart rate below 140, which meant a dramatic shift in my exercise regime. And since having my son I’ve hit the sidewalks sporadically, but not with any consistency. The net effect is that I can feel the difference in both my physical and mental well being, and it’s not a good difference.

The good news is that each day gives me a new opportunity to make the right choices. I’m registering to run a 10k at the end of February, and using the Couch to 5k app to track progress for the first eight weeks.

I recently spoke with Jace Duke, manager for Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Athletic Training Services, about returning to exercise after pregnancy. He offered these five tips.

Talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program. Tell him or her why you want to exercise, and what activities you had in mind. Do you want to improve cardiovascular health? Lose weight? Gain strength and flexibility? Your doctor will help make sure you are in good enough shape to start exercising, and then you can design a program to meet those goals.

 

Progress gradually. Make sure your exercise plan increases the strain on your body incrementally. Also, take note of your environment. You might not look forward to your second workout if your first run is at noon on July 4th.

Wear the right shoes. You don’t need to spend $150 on high-tech shoes, but you do need to have shoes that are appropriate for your exercise, and they need to be replaced whenever you can see wear.

Your body is a machine that depends on fuel, and that includes hydration. Just don’t make the fatal calculation that a 30 minute jog is license to eat anything you want for the rest of the weekend – espeically if weight loss is one of your exercise goals!

Listen to your body. You will probably be sore the day after a workout. You might be even more sore the second day. This does not necessarily mean you are injured or sidelined. Jace has a helpful way to identify injury from soreness. “God gave us two of most of our body parts. If you are experiencing symmetrical pain, you are probably just SORE. If you are experiencing asymmetrical pain (your right calf feels strained but your left calf feels just fine) you might be injured.”

Even if you are injured, though, you never have to stop exercising entirely. You might need to modify your activity. You might be sidelined from running, but you can walk, or bike, or swim. The key is to always stay active.

Melissa Schafer

Melissa Schafer

Melissa is originally from northern Virginia. She spent her entire life within 100 miles of Washington, DC until she and her husband Eric moved to Houston two years ago. Now a proud Texan, she enjoys the marathon balancing act of being a full-time working mom.
Melissa Schafer

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Melissa Schafer

Melissa is originally from northern Virginia. She spent her entire life within 100 miles of Washington, DC until she and her husband Eric moved to Houston two years ago. Now a proud Texan, she enjoys the marathon balancing act of being a full-time working mom.